Zombie Gunship is a Gritty World of Saving Humans from Zombies

Zombie Gunship is a Gritty World of Saving Humans from Zombies

There are plenty of ways to appreciate Zombie Gunship -it has a great game mechanic that one can easily get addicted to for hours on end. It has awesome graphics that has managed to overcome the limitations of the tablet medium and focus on delivering a stylized visual that is both astonishing and inspired. One can even marvel at the fact that in this day and age of run of the mill zombie games, developers can still pump out games that are intriguing as this. What sets Zombie GS aside from other titles is the fact that for the first time, your concern is not your survival, but that of others.

There are plenty of good "survivor" management games out there, but most of these places you in control of an abstract figure (much like the way players rarely get a character in an RTS game), and second, you get to directly dictate what survivors do. In Zombie Gunship, you have no influence over their actions, but you are in control of yours. Flying high above the sky makes you completely invulnerable to zombies, and the infinite ammunition payload means that your safety is never a concern. The real focus is managing the volume of zombies on the ground, and clearing a path for people to reach the safety of a bunker and survive. And by "managing the volume of zombies" we meant using firepower to turn them to itty bitty pieces. This isn't your classic zombie survival game.

The graphics are simplified -you get a full monochrome "night vision" mode that allows you to get a view of the topography (depicted in various shades of gray), survivors, which are easily visible as white, then the zombies, which, despite being purely black silhouettes onscreen, are pretty easy to spot. There are a total of two main goals in the game: keep zombies from getting into a bunker, and second, try to get as many survivors into the bunker.

Zombie Gunship is a Gritty World of Saving Humans from Zombies

The premise is simple enough, but the task gets hectic as the game progresses. The waves of zombies increase exponentially and wild shooting will get you nowhere (not only are you likely to waste time reloading, but you get penalized by accidentally shooting humans). The human shooting penalty is actually a moral dilemma -since Zombie Gunship does not punish you if a human dies from a zombie bite. There are cases where you must determine if a human survivor's distance from zombies is sufficient enough for you to take a shot (and kill the zombie without killing the human), or if you are better off letting that human die (if taking the shot is likely to kill the human as well). All your weapons have a bit of splash damage, so making decisions such as these add further to the depth of the game (we could only guess if the developers intended it to be that way).

Players get to play "save the people" across three unique environments (all presented in monochrome nightvision). There's a suburban area with houses, water towers, and low walls. The power station has a few large buildings, large open roads, and tricky paths. Lastly, the starting point, a vast open desert with split by cliffs -like the kind of badlands you'd expect from other zombie mobile games like Earn to Die. These various locations each add to the replay value of the game.

Aside from the awesome gameplay, graphics, and delivery, we also have to give credit to Zombie Gunship's excellent audio -from the resounding boom of the howitzers to the radioed voice clips from central command giving you praises for good shots (and berating you if you killed someone), you truly feel like you are sitting in a gunship with the lives of people in your hands - making Zombie Gun Ship with of the best zombie shootem ups around.